Theater im Kopf

Forced Entertainment: Dirty Work (The Late Shift), PACT Zollverein, Essen / Hebbel am Ufer (HAU1), Berlin (Regie: Tim Etchells)

Von Sascha Krieger

Was alles an diesem Abend passiert: Atombomben explodieren, Autos krachen ineinander, tausende Schmetterlinge schwirren durch den Raum, ein Mann entleert seinen Darm auf die Bühne, es gibt politische Attentate, Selbst- und andere Morde, wir schauen einer Leiche bei ihrer Zersetzung zu, die Wright Brothers fliegen davon und die Righteous Brothers singen dazu, es gibt Schockierendes und Weltbewegendes, aber auch Alltägliches und Berührendes. Ein Panoptikum des Lebens. All das und viel, viel mehr ist zu bestaunen, ist zu sehen in den fünf Akten der neuen Arbeit von Forced Entertainment, einer Weiterentwicklung ihres Abends Dirty Work aus dem Jahr 1998. Zu sehen? Ja, aber nur, wenn der Zuschauer den Blick abwendet von der Bühne, ihn nach innen richtet, oder – besser, aber auch gefährlicher aufgrund des Risikos wegzunicken – die Augen schließt. Denn der Blick auf die Bühne offenbart: nichts.

Das Hebbel am Ufer/HAU1 (Bild: Sascha Krieger)

Weiterlesen

Who’ll Break the Circle?

Based on the film by Luchino Visconti: Obsession, Toneelgroep Amsterdam / Barbican Centre, London / Wiener Festwochen (Director: Ivo van Hove)

By Sascha Krieger

Emptiness. A bare, somewhat modernist room filled with nothingness. Cool, functional, lifeless. Two people, far apart. If there is a relationship, it’s one of power. The distance is palpable. In the middle of Jan Versweyveld’s stage, there is an old large engine hanging from the ceiling. It stutters then goes out. A young man enters the stage, wistfully playing the harmonica. He will get the engine started – in more than one way. Luchino Visconti’s debut film Ossessione is a tale of unbridled passion and its destructiveness. The juxtaposition of a cold, power-based marriage and the heat of an obsessive affair leads to disaster. There is no middle ground, no gray among the black and the white. In Ivo van Hove’s stage adaptation, the sweltering heat of the film is replaced by a chilling coolness. Spaces are wide, distances large, bodies tense. When Gino, the young drifter, and Hanna, the oppressed, wife finally get together, a suspended accordion is playing. The bodies dance a ballet of constricted, obsessive passion. The climax is signalled by long-held dissonant chord. Closeness is achieved, the distance overcome. Nothing is good.

The Barbican Centre (Image: Sascha Krieger)

Weiterlesen

When the World Is Closing In

Edward Albee: The Goat or Who Is Sylvia?, Theatre Royal Haymarket, London (Director: Ian Rickson)

By Sascha Krieger

„Notes toward a definition of tragedy“. This is the subtitle Edward Albee gave his 2002 Tony and Pulitzer winning play The Goat or Who Is Sylvia? What he was clearly interested in here is how the Aristotelian idea of tragedy can relate to and be transported into our enlightened, free, individualistic and democratic present days? A great man’s downfall at the hands of fate due to transgressions he might not even be in control of – how is that even conceivable today? He wasn’t the first to ask these questions in the modern age: Tennessee Williams‘ plays often test tragedic structure – interestingly often with female characters in the „hero’s“ role – Arthur Miller conceived Death of a Salesman as a modern tragedy, replacing the „great“ with the „ordinary“ man. Albee’s focus is different: he looks at what a „transgression“ triggering the mechanics of tragedy might be today and he asks society whether it has completely shade its taboo-enhancing, punishing nature yet. The answers he comes up with in The Goat are rather terrifying.

Theatre Royal Haymarket (Image: Sascha Krieger)

Weiterlesen

When Darkness Comes

Edward Albee: Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, Harold Pinter Theatre, London (Director: James MacDonald)

By Sascha Krieger

There seems to be a sense out there in what we call the „Western world“ of decline, of having our best days behind us, a desire to find our way back to a golden age when things were clearer, better, less, confusing, more black and white. In the United States, for example, a hollow reality TV character just got elected President on the stunningly meaningless promise to „Make America Great Again“. When, one might ask, was America „great“ and what was its greatness? Many point back to the 1950s, an idyllic yet modern, quiet yet industrial America unperturbed by social unrest, fresh off winning a world war, self-confident and free from self-doubt. Sure, there was McCarthy, moral oppression and a deeply entrenched patriarchal society but aren’t those minor flaws – or perhaps none at all? Edward Albee’s perennial audience favourite Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? is set against this America’s backdrop. A well-respected couple, he a college professor, she the university President’s daughter, inviting a new teacher and his wife into their home. What could go wrong? The answer should be pretty well-known by now: everything. For, beyond the shiny surface lies a yawning abyss, a black nothingness of fear and desolation. The black hole of a world on the brink of distinction.

The Harold Pinter Theatre (Image: Sascha Krieger)

Weiterlesen

The Story of It All

Tom Stoppard: Travesties, Menier Chocolate Factory / Apollo Theatre, London (Director: Patrick Marber)

By Sascha Krieger

1920s music is playing, the battered red curtain evokes the heyday of comic theatre and the music hall. An old man in a worn out bathrobe and a tattered straw hat shuffles on stage. He tries to raise the curtain, taps on it, smiles uneasily. First, nothing happens, then, slowly, the curtain goes up, an cluttered old library in revealed, books everywhere, pages on the floor, a labyrinth of remembered – and forgotten – knowledge. In Tom Stoppard’s early play Travesties, Henry Carr, an employee at the British Consulate in Zurich in 1917, remembers the days when the swiss city was a centre of revolution: Lenin in exile, James Joyce re-inventing the novel, Dada questioning the very nature of art. And Carr at the centre of it all, spying on Lenin, becoming friends with Dada hero Tristan Tzara, playing in a theatre production put on by Joyce. At least this is how he remembers it. It will be only at the very end, that the audience will know how unreliable Carr as a narrator is. He re-invents himself in the process, tells of meetings that never could have happened and mixes up life and art by transforming his story, or rather stories, into a version of Oscar Wilde’s The importance of Being Earnest, the very play he acted in in Zurich.

The Apollo Theatre (Image: Sascha Krieger)

Weiterlesen

Land of the Faceless

Martin Crimp: The Treatment, Almeida Theatre, London (Director: Lyndsey Turner)

By Sascha Krieger

A woman tells her story to a couple (a married one, by the way) of film producers. They are interested, but see room for clarification here, a little tightening of the story there. More people come on board, a writer, the film’s potential star, everyone with their own agenda, their own desire to control the story. So the woman loses hers and she won’t be the only one. Trying to regain control, she gives it up completely. This, admittedly, is a rather rough summary of Martin Crimp’s play The Treatment, an ambivalent title, of course, primarily referring to the term the film industry gives a short project summary used to pitch it, but also evoking the treatment reality and those who live it receive at the hands of a machine that cares about box office numbers and little else. Reality has a difficult position in this play which – while starting out in the false security of a realistic scene – soon drifts off. Into the abstract, the metatheatrical, the thriller and horror spaces. The way people lose control over there lives, the way outside forces appear and take over, the slow building up of a threatening, claustrophobic, stifling atmosphere are reminiscent of the plays of Harold Pinter, even though, unlike in the works of the Nobel Laureate, there is a distinct and recognisable reality The Treatment plays off.

The Almeida Theatre (Image: Sascha Krieger)

Weiterlesen

Playing Death

Tom Stoppard: Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead, The Old Vic, London (Director: David Leveaux)

By Sascha Krieger

At the end, there is a familiar display: a pile of bodies covering the stage, a king, a queen, a prince, all slain, lamented, mourned. It’s the end of Hamlet, a royal family all wiped out, a Norwegian prince vowing to remember them an d to restore the realm’s greatness in their name. However, as any student of history knows: for every „great person“ mourned, there are hundreds, thousands discarded. Nameless, faceless victims who do not count or matter and never have. The waste of human ambition, thrown on history’s garbage heap. William Shakespeare knew about this and yet, he did play this game, too. His nameless masses, sacrificed without hesitation to advance once objectives, are named Rosencrantz and Guildenstern. At the end of David Leveaux‘ production, they are missing from the elaborate tableau of carnage. They die off stage in Hamlet  and they do so here. Just before the final image, they have their lights turned off, literally. Footnotes, material to be dispensed with.

The Old Vic (Image: Sascha Krieger)

Weiterlesen

Maschine Menschheit

Friedrich Schiller: Die Räuber, Residenztheater, München (Regie: Ulrich Rasche) – eingeladen zum Theatertreffen 2017

Von Sascha Krieger

Das Leben, so sagt man, sei ein Kreislauf. Leben, Tod, Leben und immer so weiter. Doch was wenn zum natürlichen ein menschengemachter zweiter Kreislauf tritt. Einer einer der Macht und Gewalt? Einer, den Friedrich Schiller lange vor dem Zeitalter beschrieb, das wir heute das „industrielle“ nennen und vor das wir mittlerweile das eine oder andere „post“ setzen. Kreisläufe sind seit damals viele dazugekommen, solche der Effizienz und Nützlichkeit, andere der Vernichtung. Das vergangene Jahrhundert erfand dafür das Fließband, den Kreislauf als physisches Prinzip und Werkzeug, an dem es Autos produzierte und Tote. Zwei riesige Exemplare stehen nun auf der Bühne des Münchner Residenztheaters. Ulrich Rasche, Regisseur und Bühnenbildner in Personalunion, hat sie dort hingestellt. Dort erscheint zunächst Katja Bürkle, die derzeit die erkrankte Valery Tscheplanowa ersetzt, die wiederum für Bibiana Beglau einsprang, die lange vor der Premiere wegen „künstlerischer Differenzen“ das Handtuch warf. Auch das eine Art Kreislauf. Mit harter Stimme und herausforderndem Gestus, den Körper gespannt, als würde er gleich giftige Pfeile verschießen, proklamiert sie ihr Programm der Selbstermächtigung. Das Programm einer Macht, die sich aus radikalem Individualismus speist, sich selbst einziger Maßstab ist. Macht als absolutes Prinzip.

Bild: Andreas Pohlmann

Weiterlesen

Der Störenfried als Exponat

Bertolt Brecht: Baal, Berliner Ensemble (Probebühne), Berlin (Regie: Sebastian Sommer)

Von Sascha Krieger

Einmal noch Brecht. Weil es ja sein muss an diesem Haus, das der Dramatiker aus Augsburg einst gründete, das ihm ein Denkmal vor dem Haupteinang gebaut hat, das bis heute mit seinem Konterfei wirbt. Bertolt Brecht ist der Schlüssel zum Selbstverständnis dieses Theaters, sein gemeinsamer Nenner, zuweilen auch sein Feigenblatt. Das war immer so, auch in den 18 Jahren Intendanz von Claus Peymann. Brecht hielt auch dieser Hausherr stets hoch, auch wenn er dessen Stücke meist anderen überließ. Manfred Karge zum Beispiel oder Philip Tiedemann. Auch die Regie-Großmeister Leander Haußmann und sogar Robert Wilson durften mal ran. Das galt auch für den Nachwuchs: Sebastian Sommer kommt der Position des Nachwuchsregisseurs an diesem nicht gerade dem Jugendwahn verfallenen Haus wohl a nächsten und ihm gebührt nun die Ehre, den Brecht-Rausschmeißer der Ära Peymann zu geben. Kein verstaubtes Leerstück soll es sein, Lieblingsstücke wie die Dreigroschenoper  oder die Mutter Courage waren schon vergriffen. Also darf der „Junge“ etwas vom jungen, durchaus wilden Brecht inszenieren. Den Baal, diese expressionistische Tour de Force, über die sich vor noch nicht allzu langer Zeit Frank Castorf – auch er ein Abschied nehmender, der womöglich bald an diesem Hause inszenieren wird? – mit den Brecht-Erben anlegte.

Bild: Barbara Braun

Weiterlesen

„Wehe dem, der auf die Stufen kotzt!“

Nach Wenedikt Jerofejew: Reise nach Petuschki. Ein Delirium bzw. Kurzzeitodyssee per Bahn, Volksbühne am Rosa-Luxemburg-Platz, Berlin (Regie: Sebastian Klink)

Von Sascha Krieger

Zu jedem Abschied, so sagt man, gehört ein ordentliches Besäufnis. Nun, vielleicht sagt „man“ so nicht, die Tradition, das Abschiednehmen mit dem einen oder anderen Schluck mehr oder weniger  Hochprozentigem erträglicher zu machen, ist weit verbreitet. Nun boten die bisherigen Abschiedsabende der Castorfschen Volksbühne zwar großartiges Theater, viel Inhalt und ganz viele Gründe, das Haus in der Inkarnation der vergangenen 25 Jahre zu vermissen, eine wirkliche Abschiedsfeier war nicht dabei. Das holt Sebastian Klink, einer der wenigen jüngeren Regisseure am Haus – und langjähriger Regieassistent Castorfs – jetzt nach. Das russische Repertoire war hier stets stark vertreten und das Klischee spricht „dem Russen“ eine gewisse Neigung zu alkoholischen Getränken zu – was läge da näher als Wenedikt Jerofejews Besäufnis- und Bekenntniswerk Reise nach Petuschki, dem wichtigsten dieses Außenseiter-Schritstellers, der erst in der Spätphase der Sowjetunion verlegt wurde und kurz darauf starb, der in diesem „Poem“, wie er es nannte, seine Erfahrungen mit der realsowjetischen Wirklichkeit in einem sprachlichen Delirium verewigte, das nirgendwo anders hinführen konnte als in die Apokalypse?

Bild: Sascha Krieger

Weiterlesen