Archiv der Kategorie: Felix van Groeningen

Love and Distance

Film review: Beautiful Boy (Director: Felix van Groeningen)

By Sascha Krieger

Eventually ending up as the festival’s Panorama section audience award winner, the 2013 edition of the Berlin Film Festival featured a film that would send theatres full of hardened critics and experienced film lovers into collective crying fits that would last beyond the closing credits. That film, The Broken Circle Breakdown, the story of a great but tragic love, established Belgian film maker Felix van Groeningen as a master of raw, undiluted and painfully honest emotion. In his newest effort, Beautiful Boy, he dives into highly emotional waters again, exploring that first love of all, that between parents and children. Based on David Sheff’s book of the same name and his son Nick’s follow-up Tweak, it tells the real-life story of their struggle with and ultimately against Nic’s drug addiction that he got captured in during his teenage years. It covers several years, jumping back and forth, treating time not as a linear entity but a stagnating event, stuck in repetition, going in, yes, broken, circles.

Image: (c) 2018 AMAZON CONTENT SERVICES LLC. François Duhamel

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Berlinale 2013: Diary Day 11

By Sascha Krieger

It’s done. We made it, survived it again, got out of it with square eyes and loads of memories. 400 films, 11 days – lucky those who could see a tenth of what was offered. The Bears are traveling to their new homes: a golden one to Romania, for Child’s Pose, two silver ones to Bosnia, and, thankfully, Jafar Panahi, the Iranian filmmaker who is banned from film making and faces six years in prison, wasn’t forgotten though he missed out on the Golden Bear which he would so have deserved. No controversy, everybody like the jury’s decisions – which fits well with a Berlinale that was a little boring, some might even say it marked a further step on the road to this festivals increasing irrelevance. The competition was particularly disappointing and was only saved by gems or at least challenging offerings from minor film regions, particularly eastern Europe. The great film nations: Germany was largely absent, the time when the major German directors rushed to get their films t Berlin seems to be over again – even this year’s juror Andreas Dresen appears to prefer Cannes these days. France brought three films, none of which would have been likely to even make it to the Cannes competition. China, Japan, the UK: absent. And the U.S.? They brought films that offered stars, the highlights of which was a well-made thriller (Side Effects) and a charming but totally harmless comedy (Prince Avalanche). Weiterlesen

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