Archiv des Autors: Sascha Krieger

Im ewigen Schneesturm

Nach Thomas Mann: Der Zauberberg, Deutsches Theater, Berlin – Livestream (Regie: Sebastian Hartmann) – eingeladen zum Theatertreffen 2021

Von Sascha Krieger

Stapfen sie durch den (imaginären) Schnee von Thomas Manns dystopischer Alpenlandschaft oder durch die Leere von Raum uns Zeit, die Linda Pöppel zu Beginn mit reichlich Rast- und Ratlosigkeit reflektiert? Eine geisterhafte Seilschaft hat Sebastian Hartmann da unsichtbar zusammengebunden auf fast leerer weißumwandeter Bühne. Hier ist alles Weiß: Die Wände, die Bodysuits (Kostüme: Adriana Braga Peretzki), die Gesichter, die Haare. Nur eine Art Gerüst ragt heraus – ein Ankerpunkt? Ein Galgen? Ein Kran? (Bühne: Hartmann) Es ist eine Art Danach, in dem die Spieler*innen, die Figurenfragmente agieren, aber eines, bei dem es kein Davor gibt. „Ist im Ewigen ein Nacheinander möglich?“, fragt Pöppel dann auch zu Beginn. Lässt sich die Zeit erzählen, will sie wissen, wenn sie denn nicht enden solle. Gleiches gelte für den Raum. Und so gibt es beide hier nicht und natürlich sind sie zugleich vorhanden. Denn dieser Abend spielt in der messbaren Zeit (er dauert genau zwei stunden) und er findet in einem Raum statt, der Bühne des Deutschen Theaters. Die aber eben auch ein Nichtraum ist, geschlossen, von den Zuschauenden nicht physisch betretbar, nur noch virtuell zu erahnen, in der Rezeption individuell zu erschaffen.

Bild: Arno Declair

Weiterlesen

Berlinale 2021: Reviews Part 6

By Sascha Krieger

Nous (Encounters / France / Director: Alice Diop)

In Nous, Alice Diop moves along the RER B regional train route through Paris and drops in on the lives of people outside the public eye. There is the elderly caregiver, Diop’s sister whose clients provide glances into the struggles of old people no longer useful to society but also a richness in memories and generosity, society neds to make more use of. Diop films a Senegalese man repaiting cars, children sliding down a hill, groups of vong PoC chilling, interviews a writer reading from diaries. Juxtaposed in a church service celebrating the king executed in the French Revolution and a hunting party that seems to come from a different time. What starts almost like a naturalistic social study that is not immediately discernible as non-fiction turns into a calm, quietly observed mosaic of lives on the outside. Inserting footage of her dead father and an old Super 8 video with her long gone mather appearing, Diop includes her own history in what appears to be a warm, generous, patient picture of a society that only seems to exist on its fringes. What connect the monarchists and the immigrants wasting their lives away forgotten, what except the train running though all these lives? Alice Diop has no answer except her film in which all of this is connected through the power of the truthful camera eye. It tells its own story, benevolent, fragmented, honest, hopeful.

Nous (Image: © Sarah Blum)

Weiterlesen

Berlinale 2021: Reviews Part 5

By Sascha Krieger

Una película de policías (Competition / Mexico / Director: Alonso Ruizpalacios)

In the end, they catch him. Agter a spectacular chase into an underground station, the two cops arrest the robber they started following several blocks away. The scene leading to theis is a mixture of hughly crafted genre fare and its own parody. Of course, it’s fake, a heroic as well as humorous look at police clichés. The reality is different and director Alonso Ruizpalacios comes at it from many angles. First he has to cops tell their story, quite convincingly until it turns out they’re just actors who are then shown rehearsing their lines as well as infiltrating police academies and departments to learn about being a cop, reflecting on it in video diaries, before the real cops appear, those they played and whose falling out with their superiors they have just enacted. Una película de policías is an elaborate dance of fiction and reality, of clichés and stereotypes and real experiences. In under two packed hours, the systemic problems are made clear, the corruption, the neglect, the utter cynicism of the statement in which cops are victims and culprits at the same time. But also the idealism of many shows, there is no black and white in the blue. It’s a wild ride in which acting becomes a metaphor for police work, where it is involved, too, though, as an actor says, whereas he acts within fantasy, they do so within reality. The levels mix, become almost indistinguishable. What’s real, what’s fake? Whatever it is, it’s serious as hell. And deadly. In many different ways.

Ha Nan Xia Ri (Image: © FactoryGateFilms)

Weiterlesen

Berlinale 2021: Reviews Part 4

By Sascha Krieger

Guzen to sozo (Competition / Japan / Director: Ryusuke Hamaguchi)

Two women meet on an escalator. They seem to recogniz each other as old friends or more. Even after noticing their mistake, they decide to continue to play, each taking the part of the one the other mistook her for. It’s the third part of Ryusuke Hamaguchi’s triptych about the what ifs of human relationships. And it#s a masterpiece in its light tone, it pale but bright and crisp images full of disappointment and hope, its exploration of what was and could have been as a gate towards moving on. It’s a masterpiece, too, in depecting women, the repressed feelings, lives as compromises, the strength of perseverence, the freedom an unexpected valve carries. All these are present in the other episodes, a love and friendship triangle with two alternative endings and a (rather weaker because of a more traditional stereotype of a woman coming to find herself through the tutoring of a man) failed and then ironically successful attempt at trapping a professor (with an ending that violates the rest of the film’s tone). Bound together by Robert Schumann’s piano music, these three miniatures composed of real-time scenes are glimpses into the eternal as well as very modern struggle to find a way in life and to other people that roles and expectations – society’s and those internalized – often handicap. The poetry of desire, emotion and self-determination and the ironic tragedy of the unknowable other creates a lightly treading, quietly intense gem that in the end, finds this elusive path in the irony of not recognizing who one thought one knew and getting to know if not them but at least oneself in the process. The viewer walks more lightly after the closing credits roll.

Guzen to sozo (Image: © Neopa/Fictive)

Weiterlesen

Berlinale 2021: Reviews Part 3

By Sascha Krieger

Petite Maman (Competition / France / Director: Céline Sciamma)

When her grandmother dies, 8-year-old Nelly gets to empty her old house with her parents. After the sudden departure of her mother, nelly finds a new companion with whom she has more in common than she expects. Paintes in gentle, slightly fading autumn colours, Petite Maman embarks on a quiet journey of self-discovery and the exploration of what it means to be a family, treading the awkward line between finding one’s individual identity and forging the connection with others. While the dialogue often appears beyond the years of those who speak it, it as well as the crossing of lines between the real and the imagines, the past and the present (or is it the future?) feels entirely natural, being narrated in a loconic, naturalistic way, the camera a close, but somewhat detached observer, a neutral eye, not wondering about what it sees but accepting it as a journey of discovery, a first step towards growing up. A keen observer of childhood, director Céline Sciamma brings tenderness as well as a sceptical distance to her story and protagonists. What blooms in the struggling light of the aging year, is not spectacular but it spans all ages, all lives while never abandoning the personal, individual stories it tells. A fleeting glimps, a deeply moving miniature, a great film in the best sense.

Petite Maman (Image: © Lilies Films)

Weiterlesen

Berlinale 2021: Reviews Part 2

By Sascha Krieger

Inteurodeoksyeon (Competition / Republic of Korea / Director: Hong Sangsoo)

A young man, a young woman. In almost timeless black and white, a distant memory, a casual story told. By whom? Who knows. Three episodes does Hong Sangsoo build around the pair. Momentary glimpses the spaces between them the viewer has to fill. The stories remain sketchy, much to guess. It’s a film about the unknowable, the other person, that enigmatic being. As so often with Hong, the camera pretends to be a neutral observer but really shapes our view. Subtle zooms, slow moves from one face to the other, it accentuates, loneliness, distance. A film not directly commenting on but being informed by the pandemic. There is just one real physical touch, right at the end, a necessary one, almost apologetic. But it sets the screen on fire, highlighting what is missing in these lives dominated by the unspoken, the unspeakable, by a never-ending series of constant withdrawal. The other remains distant. Is she looking at us, two friemds wonder when spotting one of their mothers in the distance. They don’t try and find out. Don’t bother her, the son says. Just 66 minutes long, Hong’s film is an essay on the human condistion, a semi-abstract poem, a sketchy study on the lengths we go to not to bother each other. Until it explodes in an uncalled for embrace. Black and white magic, a sigh, a cry for love. A humble masterpiece.

Inteurodeoksyeon (Image: © Jeonwonsa Film Co.Production)

Weiterlesen

Berlinale 2021: Reviews Part 1

By Sascha Krieger

Ich bin dein Mensch (Competition / Germany / Director: Maria Schrader)

Alma is a successful anthropologist who has given up on love and adopted a cynical facade following a traumatic event. She participates as an expert in an experiment to evaluate the ethical aspects of humanoid robots created to become a human’s perfect partner. Maria Schrader’s film is a quite entertaining back and forth as Alma struggles to stay aloof from Tom and not be enticed by his well-programmed affection which, of course, ultimately fails. It is to the film’s credit that it tries to address the wider-reaching ethical and philosophical issues of artificial intelligence and its drive towards becoming ever more human less in a preaching, dictactic way but as a natural part of the plot, of dialogue and interaction, by embedding the theoretical in the situational. It dows so by adopting feature of the romantic comedy, in a very Germany, a little rougher way. The taming of the shrew kind of stereotype isn’t too heavy-handed and the conventional storytelling has a light enough touch. In the end, however, the film opts for the easy way out, the lighter-hearted self-development slash romance angle. The friendly lighting conceals little but hides too much, the softening of the hardened woman cannot quite escape its sexist roots. Thus, the film falls short of the exploration of what it means to be human that it clearly tries to be but provides enough moments of hinting at it in a playful way to make it entertaining and reflective enough to send the viewer on their own train of thoughts – if they choose to embark on the journey.

Ich bin dein Mensch (Image: © Christine Fenzl)

Weiterlesen

Im Zentrum

Alexander Eisenach nach Sophokles: Anthropos, Tyrann (Ödipus), Volksbühne Berlin – Livestream-Premiere (Regie: Alexander Eisenach)

Von Sascha Krieger

„Mittendrin statt nur dabei“: Mit diesem Werbeslogan eines ehemaligen deutschen Sportsenders ließe sich auch die Grundidee dieses Abends beschreiben: Weil das Publikum ja derzeit nicht persönlich im Theater sein kann, stellt Alexander Eisenach es kurzerhand in den Mittelpunkt. Zentriert auf der Bühne befindet sich eine 360-Grad-Kamera, die Augen und Ohren des Zuschauers darstellt, durch die er mittendrin ist im Bühnengeschehen, sich seine Perspektive durch Tastenbetätigung an Keyboard oder Fernbedienung frei wählen kann. Soo ist man mehr „mittendrin“ als säße man im Zuschauerraum, auch wenn man physisch abwesend bleibt. Doch dieser Blickwinkel ist mehr als nur ein Versuch, die Zusehenden zu involvieren oder ihnen gar ihre zentrale Rolle zuzuerkennen. Er ist auch Kern der narrativen Intention Eisenachs, der sich längst einen Namen als recht aufgeregter Verhandler zeitgenössischer Brennpunktthemen und Krisen gemacht hat. Das Kameraauge ist Ödipus, der sich schuldlos unwissen – oder auch nicht – schuldig gemacht hat. Und er ist Anthropos, der Mensch, die Menschheit, also auch wir die Zusehenden, die Schuldigen am Zustand unserer Welt, an Klimakrise, Demokratiedämmerung, Pandemie.

Bild: Thomas Aurin

Weiterlesen

Im (Un)Möglichkeitsraum

Nach Ovid & Kompliz*innen: Metamorphosen [overcoming mankind], Volksbühne Berlin – Digital-Premiere (Regie: Claudia Bauer)

Von Sascha Krieger

Wie macht man im Lockdown Theater? Für wen? Und mit welcher Form der Rezeption im Blick? Fragen, die sich seit zehn Monaten immer und immer wieder stellen, ein ständiger Slalom zwischen künstlerischer Entscheidung, pragmatischem Kompromiss und dem Prinzip Hoffnung. Setzt man auf rein digitale Formen? Inszeniert man für das Publikum, das irgendwann hoffentlich wieder da sein wird? Oder sucht man hybride Formen, wie Sebastian Hartmann, der am DT seinen Zauberberg als Digitalpremiere zwar auf die – leere – Bühne brachte, aber mittels Live-Videoperformance in mehr als einen Theater-Stream transformierte. Claudia Bauer entscheidet sich bei ihrer Ovid-Adaption für Option 2. Ihre „Digital-Premiere“ ist wenig mehr als eine abgefilmte Aufzeichnung (anders als bei Hartmann findet sie nicht live statt). Ist das überhaupt Theater? Basiert dieses nicht im Kern auf der Ko-Präsenz von Performance und Zuschauenden – wenn schon nicht räumlich, dann zumindest zeitlich? Es ist vielleicht die Hoffnung auf Theater, seine Ankündigung, sein Teaser. Ein Abend geschaffen für ein anwesendes Publikum, was man so mancher Pointe, so manchem Moment, der für die Reaktion einen Live-Publikums konzipiert ist, anmerkt. Da ist eine Leerstelle, die aber nicht zum Thema wird, die ignoriert bleibt in diesem Theater-Trailer.

Bild: Julian Röder

Weiterlesen

The Show Must Go On

Friedrich Schiller: Maria Stuart, Deutsches Theater, Berlin (Regie: Anne Lenk)

Von Sascha Krieger

Natürlich fällt es nicht leicht, diese Inszenierung zu rezensieren, als wäre sie ein ganz „normaler“ Theaterabend. Zum Zeitpunkt ihrer Premiere ist bereits klar, dass auf dieser wie auf allen anderen Bühnen des Landes mindestens vier Wochen lang nichts mehr gehen wird. Nach der dritten Aufführung sind die Lichter aus – wann die Bretter wieder zur Welt werden, lässt sich kaum vorhersehen. Da passt es, dass diese letzten gut zwei Stunden eine Übung in Isolation sind. Judith Oswalds Bühne ist eine Art Setzkasten, bestehend aus Boxen, in denen die Figuren – mit zwei Ausnahmen – stets für sich sind. Sie interagieren getrennt durch Wände, die sie immer wieder berühren, wie sehnend nach der Präsenz einer*s anderen. Doch sie bleiben getrennt, isoliert, gefangen in ihren persönlichen Gefängnissen. Ganz unten ist Maria, die Gefängniszelle eng und undurchdringlich, über ihr, in der größten Box, Elisabeth, die Herrschende, Entscheidende, ebenso isoliert und ausweglos. Um sie herum gruppieren sich die Männer, behende die Boxen wechselnd, was den Frauen nicht vergönnt ist. Wo letztere an ihren Plätzen und in ihren Rollen verharren müssen, dürfen erstere diese wechseln. It’s a man’s world.

Bild: Arno Declair

Weiterlesen